Want Your Winter Evergreens to Stay EVER-green?

WATER! WATER! WATER!

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Fall is the prime time to keep root growth hydrated. And evergreen trees and shrubs, especially those planted within the last couple of years, are particularly vulnerable to winter stresses— drying, burning and possible loss. Since we’ve had a pretty dry September and October, I’d recommend adding adequate amounts of water to your garden beds until the ground freezes.

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What’s considered adequate amounts water?

As a general rule for:

• garden beds: 1” of water or rain per week. Water can be easily measured by placing an empty tuna can, or rain gauge in your garden where your sprinkler hits. 

• evergreen shrubs: add two gallons of water for each shrub, one time per week.

• evergreen trees: add five gallons of water, one time per week.

Also, pay special attention to broad leaf evergreens, such as rhododendron, holly, and pieris japonica. As well as arborvitaes, which are notorious driers, and evergreens planted close to the house can dry out quickly too. 

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As tempting as it to think the gardening season is put to bed, remind yourself— mark your calendar or put it in your phone, to keep on watering thru Thanksgiving, think— put the turkey in oven, then go and water the evergreens!

Tiny Bulbs Give BIG Impact!

October is the perfect time to plant lots of tiny flowering bulbs. You’ll thank yourself come February, when the winter doldrums hit and these cheery little bursts of color pop up thru the snow— alerting you that, yes, spring truly is on the way! I suggest planting where you can easily enjoy them— along the front walk, by the garage, or near your back door. Fast spreaders, each year they’ll keep thickening up, forming a luscious, overflowing, flowering carpet. For an extra punch of color, add some among your perennials. One of the best things about tiny bulbs, is that they are so easy to plant— just dig a hole 4” deep by 6” wide and place 10 to 12 bulbs less than 1” apart. Then cover up. 

So much reward for so little work! 

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Eranthis hyemalis (Winter aconite)
Like little bits of sunshine, these bright yellow bloomers shoot up early, happily welcoming us to spring!


 

 

 

 

 

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Muscari (Grape hyacinth)
Best known for sweet, long-lasting blooms, in vibrant shades of blue. No garden should be without these winter hardy, no-care bulbs. Emerging in late spring they are spectacular when planted in thick borders.

 

 

 

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Anemone blanda (Anemone bulb)
Easy breezy— refreshing mounds of delightful daisy-shaped flowers come in blues, pinks, whites and mixed colors. Allow to naturalize— just plant and forget for captivating paths of color.

Autumn Pizzaz!

Keep the colors coming with these five fantastic fall-blooming, cold tolerant, varieties.

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Chrysanthemum- This fall favorite perennial bloomer always wows! Plant in groups for gorgeous masses of autumn colors- yellow, bronze, red, white, orange, burgundy and pink.

 

 

Hardy Hibiscus- A perennial show-stopper, these huge flowers come in a dazzling array of bright colors and bicolors, and continues to bloom even into October.

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Aster- The delightful colors of these beautiful, daisy-like blooms will flower vigorously until a hard frost. These perennials are also a reliable, rich source of nectar for Monarch butterflies fueling up for their fall migration.

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Ornamental Cabbage and Kale- Add these captivating annuals for wonderful textures in your garden and containers. Their curly thick leaves range in colors from whites to shades of pinks and purples.

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Pansy-These sweet, cheery, little annuals are surprisingly very hardy and can withstand cool weather while providing pops of color.

Beneficial Bugs- Your New Besties!

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Good bugs are beneficial in the garden and you’ll want to create an environment so inviting they’ll never want to leave. Let’s make our garden floor a cozy welcome mat of organic mulch while offering up a little food and drink to entice our new little friends to stay. Good bugs even like to dine on tiny, easy to reach, flower nectars on occaison. Plant a variety of tiny blooms that will continuously flower throughout the season for them to feed on, and you’ll have a garden filled with multitudes of BBFF’s (best beneficial friends forever!) 

Love the Ladybugs (Lady Beetles) This cute, red spotted bug can eat their fair share of aphids, mealybugs, and mites. However, it’s their baby larvae that are the real voracious eaters. But unlike their mothers, the babies are pretty scary looking, so don’t be tempted to destroy these very beneficial alligator-like little monsters. Ladybugs are attracted to: carrots, parsley, dill, fennel, yarrow, angelica, and coreopsis.

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Praying MantisThese amazing insects are fun to watch and are even thought of as garden pets. They are beneficial because of their enormous appetites, constantly chowing down, night and day, on a wide range of pests, including caterpillars, mosquitoes, aphids, mites, moths, flies, wasps, beetles, and crickets. Praying Mantis are attracted to: tall grasses, shrubs, cosmos, marigolds, and dills.

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Lovely Lacewings  This delicate, green, fairylike insect with its huge transparent wings is one of the most effective beneficial bugs for your garden. They consume pollen and nectar exclusively, so keeping that diverse supply of flowering plants throughout the season will help keep Lacewings thriving. Their babies are very similar in appearance to Ladybug larvae, but are even more ravenous, consuming up to 100 aphids per day– earning them the nickname “aphid lions.” They also dine on whitefly, leafhopper, mealybugs, and caterpillars. Lacewings are attracted to: angelica, caraway, coreopsis, goldenrod, yarrow, tansy.

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Remember, it’s a bug-eat-bug world out there!

Gardening Glory

August is beautiful in Grosse Pointe this year. With the delightful temperatures, adequate rain, and loads of sunshine, the Pointes are peaking in all their gardening glory- and it’s evident everywhere you turn. Now is the time when all the work, and pleasure, in your garden comes to its beautiful fruition. Annuals are bursting with showy waves of color.

The hydrangeas are breathtaking with their beautiful blooms. Hibiscus is boldly shouting for your attention and roses are showing off why they are worth the extra effort. Mounds of daisies are spilling over, laughing in the sunshine. Now is the time for all humans, and pollinators alike, to sit back in your favorite garden spot and drink it all in. ahhhh!

This is some very tasty nectar...and I am loaded down with pollen!

This is some very tasty nectar...and I am loaded down with pollen!

June Is Busting Out All Over!

This is a wonderful time of year to relax and enjoy the gardens. But, as you look around, use a critical eye and consider the plants that make up the landscape around you. Is everything the same shape of leaf or flower? Are there blank spots just begging for something pretty? Consider mixing things up in shape, structure or color. Contrast will draw the eye!

When adding something new to the garden, keep in mind the human eye is drawn to odd number groupings; three or five plants grouped together will create a cohesive look, adding more impact than a dot of color here, there and yonder.

Save room in the gardens for summer and fall bloomers, perennials and annuals, too! Don’t just shop your favorite nurseries in June. Visiting later in the summer you find wonderful new plants to lengthen the bloom time in your gardens. Fortunately, there are many perennials that bloom in late summer, including ornamental grasses, lobelia (the perennial variety!), asters, Russian sage, cimicifuga and sedum. And there are plenty of sun-loving, heat tolerant annuals to complement them, such as ageratum, alyssum, nicotiana, salvia and verbena.

With a little planning you can create annual-perennial partnerships that will keep your flower gardens looking terrific for a full 5 or 6 months.

WEEKEND of FUN PLAY or FUN WORK?

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Don’t put off enjoying a walk or bike ride, BUT – don’t put off weeding either! 

Weeding in spring helps you and the garden in summer.  It keeps them “at bay” and helps your desirable plants grow without too much competition.  Even aggressive perennials can become unwelcome intruders if not checked early on, such as the obedient plant, monarda and chelone.

Try a new restaurant in the neighborhood, and treat your weaker, struggling plants to some extra TLC by adding some compost to their world.

Use your own or buy some and apply a 1-2” ring at the base of your perennials, shrubs and trees.  Be sure to start a few inches from the crown (where the plant stem meets the soil).  Compost is much better for the soil than chemicals - it adds a nutrition boost but also enhances the texture of the soil which encourages good drainage, air circulation and overall soil health.

Planning some time for liquid refreshments during your holiday weekend? 

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Be sure to include a watering schedule appropriate for your garden.

Clay soils need deep watering less frequently, so let those beds dry out between soaks.  Sandy soils need deep watering too, but drain much faster, so be aware of plants wilting to tell you when to water.

 

 

It’s officially growing season - happy Memorial Day!

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Button Up Your Overcoat!

It's too cold AT NIGHT to put those annuals outside right now. 

You have been to the nurseries and seen them, couldn't help yourself, and bought a bunch.

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Well the nights are going to be in the 30s and 40s for the next 10 days and quite a few annuals will not make it with that cold.

And if you planted them in our cold soil, it could be the kiss of death.

If they are in containers or flats, still keep them in a protected area (garage, enclosed porch, etc) and if they are in the ground, well, you could dig them up and hold them with the other plants in a protected spot till the soil is over 50°. 

You can buy a soil thermometer at our local nurseries to be sure when your garden has warmed up.  Or keep following us for up to date safe gardening alerts!

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"Button up your overcoat, when the wind is breezy" and your plants too!

What do April Showers and May Flowers Have in Common with You?

We’ve made it through the rainy weather of April and the earth is bursting forth around us with it’s stunning spring show.  It’s a terrific demonstration that just like you and me, the plants around us need food, oxygen and water to live - and live well! 

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It’s amazing how much change happens in just 24 hours when the temps are moderate and water is plentiful.  The drama is never more obvious than during Spring – that is until the scorching heat of summer arrives.  Then we worry if our gardens and lawns will survive.  

 

Well don’t worry - now is the time for us to plan ahead! 

A well thought out irrigation strategy is not only critical to enjoying your landscape all year, it’s also the most cost efficient way to manage your watering needs. 

Sprinklers are great for your lawn but a very costly way to water much of your garden, because the extreme heat of summer causes water to evaporate much faster; think how quickly the streets and sidewalks dry up after a summer rain.  That means you need even more water to ensure a good, deep soak.  But how much, in which areas, and how can you tell when enough is enough? 

You probably have areas that would benefit from a drip system which targets water delivery directly to the soil.   Installation can be done professionally or as your next DIY project.  No more wasting a drop on paved areas, walls that enclose your green space or hoping enough water drips through the canopies to reach those thirsty roots in the soil.  This means a huge increase in plant health and a substantial savings on your water bill.

Downspoutsare another great resource of supplemental water.  There are great ways to capture and redirect that flow to benefit your landscape as it filters through your soil - before it flows into our water table through sewers, ditches, streams and rivers to the beautiful lakes around us.

Toxins and infrastructure are just a part of our Clean Water equation.  Our population has long outgrown the capacity of our aging drainage systems, so it’s never been more important to understand our individual part with a smart watering strategy. 

A little planning goes a long way!

If you need help in this or other areas of your garden management, please don’t hesitate to contact me for a consultation at 313. 881.2223 or Mil@asoutherngardener.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Don't Throw Away Your Pollinators!

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Leaving the beds with winter cover right now is hard to do.  We want to “neaten up” the garden beds, especially if we have early bulbs like snow drops, winter aconite, iris reticulata or perennials such as hellebores blooming. 

It’s so exciting to watch the plants green up - but how can you if you have leaves, broken stems and flat grasses filling the beds? 

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Leave up those asters and golden rods because “good insects” lay their eggs inside.  Butterflies at the chrysalid stage could be attached to sticks and stems on your butterfly plants.  Hollow stemmed plants and the bases of tall grasses are also places where native bees may hibernate through the winter.

Cleaning away leaves might mean you also take away Fritillary butterflies.  They are wintering in the leaf litter, near violets which they use as their food source.

Maybe for this year, remove some of the debris and put it in your compost pile or an inconspicuous area where the native pollinators can still emerge.  Leave some material in the beds, pulled away from the early spring display, and watch to see if new creatures appear in your garden this Spring.

Follow this link to find a wonderful, concise download “Invite Pollinators to Your Garden” by two of MSU’s experts for additional information, and scroll down their page for additional photos and links on this most important topic.

http://msue.anr.msu.edu/resources/invite_pollinators_to_your_garden_by_creating_a_smart_habitat

A special thanks to our friend Rosann Kovalcik of Wild Birds Unlimited in Grosse Pointe Woods for also sharing her knowledge and information on this topic at http://www.wildbirdsgpw.com/dont-clean-your-yard/

Extremes are Stressful!

What a crazy winter and ‘almost spring’ we have had.  Warm weather is coaxing trees, shrubs, perennials and bulbs to wake up.  And then deep, bitter cold to slam the door on your yearnings for an early spring.

Well, don’t panic ‘cause there isn’t anything you can do at this point!  We will just have to wait and see if the forsythia will bloom, the fruit trees develop flowers, and our magnolias blossom in April. 

Usually the bulbs such as daffodils, grape hyacinth and scilla can take the teasing.

Once the woody plants start to leaf out, check for any dead branches and prune them off.  Be careful not to get too early on your pruning; some buds may take longer to open than in previous years. 

Pay attention to spring rainfall.  If we aren’t getting our usual generous amounts you may need to supplement water to the stressed plants - they will need extra attention this year to get them strong and healthy for another summer. 

Setting up a rain gauge will help you know how much additional water you may need to provide.  The general guideline is 1” per week to sustain gardens and lawns. 

Adding a rain sensor to your irrigation system and ensuring you have the right distribution system will significantly reduce your water bill (20-40%).  Consider having your landscape and irrigation plan evaluated now to optimize your water usage and retention throughout the growing season.  Who doesn't like to save money?  Contact mil@asoutherngardener.com to arrange a consultation.

 

Tomatoes and Peppers and Lettuce...Oh My!

The end of winter may not be in sight, but gardeners are already planning for their spring projects. It’s what will get us through these long cold weeks! One resource you should consider when planning your vegetable garden is Michigan Heirlooms. Owned by Karen Golden, Michigan Heirlooms is a small family-owned and operated farm, providing the highest quality, organic heirloom tomato, pepper, and lettuce plants. Karen’s theory is simple: PLAN, PLANT, PROVIDE.

Michigan Heirlooms grows all plants from their own seeds, carefully selecting from prior years’ experience. The selection is tremendous; from the smallest, sweetest cherry tomatoes (ever tasted a Coyote? It's like popping a Pez in your mouth!) to big, bold sandwich size beauties (how about a BLT with a big slice of Cosmonaut Volkov?).

And then there are the peppers. From sweet mild peppers perfect for salads or grilling (Chervena Chujski is one to try) all the way to the fiery peppers certain to give your salsa a memorable zing (the Bhut Jolokia Chocolate should come with a warning!). Karen has varieties you will not find anywhere else!

Karen’s other well-known customer favorite is her Lettuce Bowl. With a minimum of 10 different organic leaf lettuces artfully arranged in a 14” plastic bowl, as you pick young leaves, plants will re-grow, giving you fresh gourmet salads for a minimum of two months (She’s had reports of bowls lasting through to first frost). Her special soil blend needs no additional fertilizing - just keep the bowl watered and enjoy!

Orders can be placed as early as January through the website: http://michiganheirlooms.com/default.html. On there you will find really great information about the varieties she cultivates, How-To’s, links to useful resources and even recipes provided by some of her favorite customers! And then plan your May visit to her farm, located just outside Milford, Michigan, to pick up your plants and meet Karen in person.

 

Add a Little Allium!

For a bit of whimsy, fantasy or out-of-this-world in your garden, add one (or more!) of the amazing varieties of allium that are available right now. A spring blooming bulb, it appears a bit later than most tulips or daffodils, usually from late May into June. A member of the onion family, they are a striking addition to your garden and have the added benefit of being bunny and insect resistant, and loved by bees and butterflies! With heights from 20" to 48", varieties like Ambassador, Globemaster, Gladiator, Giganteum, His Excellency and Purple Sensation (pictures below) make a bold statement in any garden setting

But, there is more to the allium family that the purple globes we are familiar with. There are now new colors and shapes to add to your gardens! You can now find allium in white, pink and even red! Cultivars such as Mont Blanc, Pink Jewel and atropurpureum add more options. And it isn't just about color - it is about shape and size, too! Bring a little 'wild and crazy' to the garden with varieties like Allium christophii, 'Hair', or Allium shubertii (perhaps the largest flower of all!).

 

This is the time to shop for all of your spring bulbs and I encourage your to find spots in your garden for some of these hardy spring bulbs!

 

Be Sure To Get Tested! (Your Soil, That Is!)

Just like we go to the doctor for physical tests on a regular basis to maintain our body’s health, you should have your soil tested, too! Just like our bodies need a balance of vitamins, minerals and nutrients, your soils need 18 specific nutrients to promote a healthy environment for your lawn or gardens.

Why should you test?

  • Knowing your soil is an important diagnostic tool
  • Understanding the makeup of your soil will assure proper use of fertilizers and amendments
  • Results can assure your soil maintains a proper pH range (6.0-7.0)
  • Protect the environment from over use of chemicals
  • Cost savings from only applying fertilizers and nutrients as needed.

A complete soil test is easily available from the MSU Extension service or your local county MSU Extension office. For $25 (plus postage), you can submit soil samples for analysis, with results returned to you in about two weeks, including:

  • Soil Type
  • pH level
  • Level of organic matter, including phosphorus, potassium, calcium and magnesium.

The report will also provide recommendations for supplemental nutrients for your specific area. With the right information, your lawns and gardens will thank you for the extra care!

Going Native

I encourage everyone to consider including local native plants in the landscape. They offer so many advantages: save time and water with more tolerant plants, less fertilizer needed, and when winter approaches, less need for protection and barriers for these hardy plants.

Looking over the MSU Extension Service new supplemental website http://nativeplants.msu.edu/ , I found the following list of pretty blooming native perennials:

In addition to simplifying your work in the garden, adding natives can improve the quality of your soil, conserve water and better resist unwanted garden pests. I urge you to take a look at some of the ‘natives’ at your local nursery or garden center this holiday weekend and add some to your home’s gardens!

Darn Drought!

This has been a really tough summer on our gardens, and this may be a new reality. I have seen many mature gardens lose stable trees, shrubs and perennials this year. It is important to water regularly, and to not count on a sprinkler system, especially for trees and shrubs. But, another idea to consider is to select more drought tolerant plants for your landscape. I found and article published in 2014 by the MSU Extension with some great tolerant suggestions.

Trees:

·        White Fir (Abies concolor) is one of the most drought tolerant firs and a great alternaive to the Colorado Spruce

·        Bur Oak (Quercus macrocarpa) matures to 90’ and is considered the best choice for those really tough places, with a good growth rate when young

 

 

Shrubs:

·        Bottlebrush Buckeye (Aesculus parvifolia) is a tall multi-stem deciduous shrub with white bottle brush stems of flowers in the summer, even when planted in the shade!

·        Bush Cinquefoil (Potentilla fruticosa) is a long blooming shrub (from early summer through to frost!) with flowers in yellow, white or orange, perfect for sunny areas

 

 

Perennials:

·        Yarrow (Achillea spp.) is an easy to grow perennial with several different varieties, is a full sun plant, but drought and salt tolerant and not a favorite of the bunnies.

·        Blue False Indigo (Baptisia australis) is a full sun/part shade tall upright plant with 12” erect clusters of purple flowers in the spring, and ornamental black seed pods later in the year

For more suggestions I encourage you to visit the MSU Extension Service website for this and other great articles!

Add Some Herbs!

I am always looking for something new or unexpected to add to the container gardens I create in June.  This year, I encourage you to consider adding herbs to your floral container gardens. They offer unusual shapes or colors and many have lovely blooms of their own!

For great upright interest, consider chives, rosemary or light and airy dill.

For spilling over, think about thyme! There are several different types available with a variety of colors, like silver thyme and lemon thyme.

Herbs to consider as fillers for your containers are mint, marjoram or parsley.

For unusual colors to add to your container gardens, think about purple basil or tri-color sage.

And remember, if you have some basil in amongst your annuals in the porch container garden, is is easy to pick a couple leaves to have with tomatoes and mozzarella!

 

Welcome Feathered Friends into the Garden!

Attracting songbirds to the garden brings a new level of color, sound and activity to any garden space! But, being successful in attracting these feathered neighbors means opting for a solidly packed, multi-layer landscape that has an array of plants to supply structure and food throughout the year. When designing and planting beds and borders, think both horizontally and vertically and include a range of plants, from annuals to perennials, herbs, vegetables, and grasses. For example, the seed heads of perennials and ornamental grasses draw fall ground-feeding birds and supply cover for birds as they forage on the ground. And there is nothing like sunflower seed heads to make the goldfinches chattering and happy in late summer!

·         Include a Birdbath: Birds love to splash in water, so including a bird bath is a good method to attract songbirds. Place the birdbath in an open location so the birds can keep an eye on their surroundings and watch for potential predators; change the water every few days. You can even add a flat rock just above water level for a landing spot!

·         Remove Nonnative Plants in Favor of Nutritious Natives: As a tool for attracting songbirds to the garden, native plants provide a balanced diet of seeds and fruits that ripen at critical times. The more natives you plant, the more insects you draw, and the more varieties of songbirds that will visit.

·         Include Trees and Shrubs in Your Wildlife Garden: Trees and shrubs provide shelter from storms, hiding places from predators and supply a spot for birds to build a nest, which is helpful in attracting songbirds to the garden. Trees that bear fruits and nuts, such as flowering crabapple, also offer food to many songbirds. Include several specimens for as much variety as possible. Include at least one thorny species, such as hawthorn or rose, to provide protective perches. A few dense evergreens (juniper, spruce, yew) offer winter cover; a variety of berry-producing species such as dogwood, serviceberry, chokeberry, and viburnum provide fruit at different times in the season.

·         Reduce the Size of Your Lawn: A yard with fewer square feet devoted to turf and more space with wildlife-attracting landscape will naturally have more songbirds. For native grasses, good choices for attracting songbirds to the garden include switch grass and little bluestem; cut them back once per year in early spring.

·         Avoid Herbicides, Pesticides, and Fertilizers: Any of these substances can be deadly to birds and other wildlife. A better bet to attracting songbirds to the garden is to rely on biological controls for insect pests and keep weeds down by pulling them when they are small and before they have a chance to go to seed.

·         Keep Cats Indoors: Your felines may want to roam, but cats cause the death of millions of songbirds each year. Your best bet for attracting songbirds to the garden is to separate the two.

 

·         Figure out the Songbirds' Favorite Meals: To draw birds in, find a seed or food that is specific to the birds you want to attract. In addition, you'll draw a more interesting variety of birds than you would with a general wild bird blend. For help with feeders, seeds and other options, my favorite local source for help in this area is Wild Birds Unlimited, located at 20381 Mack Avenue, Grosse Pointe Woods, Michigan, 48236, or look for other locations at their website.

·         Maintain Bird Feeders and Birdhouses:  Feeders and birdhouses are great tools for attracting songbirds to the garden, but you must keep them in good shape. Clean feeders monthly to keep free of disease-causing bacteria; use a solution of 1 part bleach to 9 parts water. Clean out and repair boxes in late winter before nesting season begins.

 

A Garden Haven for Pollinators

There has been an increasing amount of research and information in recent years about the increasing environmental pressure on nature's pollinators. Michigan, with its significant agricultural industry, is on the forefront of research to find solutions. You might be surprised to know that even a small suburban landscape can provide significant contributions to habitat for native pollinators. Here are seven ways to make your garden a haven for native pollinators, as provided by the US Department of Agriculture

  1. Use pollinator-friendly plants in your landscape. Shrubs and trees such as dogwood, blueberry, cherry, plum, willow, and poplar provide pollen, nectar, or both, early in spring, when food is scarce.
  2. Choose a mixture of plants for spring, summer, and fall. Different flower colors, shapes, and scents will attract a wide variety of pollinators. If you have limited space, you can plant flowers in containers on a patio, balcony, and even window boxes.
  3. Reduce or eliminate pesticide use in your landscape, or incorporate plants that attract beneficial insects for pest control. If you use pesticides, use them sparingly and responsibly.
  4. Accept some plant damage on plants meant to provide habitat for butterfly and moth larvae.
  5. Provide clean water for pollinators with a shallow dish, bowl, or birdbath with half-submerged stones for perches.
  6. Leave dead tree trunks, also called “snags,” in your landscape for wood-nesting bees and beetles.
  7. Support land conservation in your community by helping to create and maintain community gardens and green spaces to ensure that pollinators have appropriate habitat.

For an easy, fun project with kids, consider making a simple 'Bee Box' or 'Bee Hotel'! With a 12" block of untreated 4"X4" and a drill with a couple different diameter bits, you can make a perfect home for mason and other native bees. You can find instructions, a downloadable .pdf and even a YouTube video from the Chicago Botanic Garden.

Once you are done with construction, mount the bee block on a protected south facing wall, tree or fence. After that, just a little annual care is needed to keep your small community of bees safe and happy in their new home. If you build this or another bee house (you can find lots of ideas online!), be sure to let me know with a photo. I'd love to see our community come together to support our pollinators!

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    A Unique Gift for a Special Mom

    You have given a special ‘mom’ in your life flowers, a spa visit, hugs and kisses, and now you are out of ideas. How about a Gift Certificate from A Southern Gardener?

    Would mom enjoy a one-on-one garden consultation with me? I love doing consultations (or what I like to think of as garden visits!) with gardeners and their gardens. Sometimes it is help to address a vexing problem like unhappy plants or how to address pests. Often, it is more about the proud gardener telling me about the space and their dreams for it than it is for me to offer ideas and suggestions.    

    Our Gift Certificates aren’t just for consultations, though! They can be applied to a beautiful new container garden. Maybe you have found a unique container that is perfect for mom and want to gift it with a certificate to have it planted.

    Or maybe there is a new garden that she would love to do.It can be a major change or just a renovation. Gift Certificates can be a perfect gift, applied to creating a custom design or more. We can create a specific one for any amount you choose.

    Is there a special event coming up this year and mom would like the yard spruced up? Make her life a little easier with a Gift Certificate towards a garden maintenance visit, another thoughtful way to help prepare for that graduation party or bridal shower in the back yard.

    If there is a special ‘mom’ (or grand-mom or aunt or sister!) in your life who is nurturing a family and a garden, planning an event, or deserves a blooming surprise, think about giving a customized Gift Certificate from A Southern Gardener! Call (313-881-2223) or email (Lynda@asoutherngardener.com) our office today!